Search

City News Blog

rss

The latest happenings in your city government.


The Lakeland City Commission voted in a unanimous decision to give City Attorney Tim McCausland the approval to work with other agencies in creating the legal framework for an independent agency to oversee the future development of high speed rail.

McCausland will be working with Cities of Tampa and Orlando and their legal teams in creating an independent agency that would manage future development of the proposed high speed rail project.  This independent oversight group would insulate taxpayers from any financial risk and divert the $2.4 billion in federal funding to a new entity such as a regional planning group.

McCausland said, “The idea is to have a plan that would allow private sector input from vendor operators and place any liability for the project on them.”

U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood has created a Friday, Feb. 25th deadline to devise an alternative plan to create the Orlando-to-Tampa line after the announcement from Gov. Scott that  he would not accept the federal funding for any high speed rail project in Florida.

In response to the Governor's announcement, the City of Tampa, the City of Orlando, and the City of Lakeland have helped "craft" the language for an Independent Regional Agency. The Central Florida Super Region continues to explore a "shared solution" when it comes to High Speed Rail for Florida.

Letter to Senator Nelson and Representative Castor regarding indepenent agency. 02-18-2011 HSR Ltr to Sen Nelson and Rep Castor pdf.pdf


On Thursday,  February 16th the Lakeland Police Department honored four young citizens with the  “Do the Right Thing Award”. The “Do The Right Thing” program highlights the positive actions of local young people that often go unnoticed. The winners of the bi-monthly  award for December and January are: Thomas Boles, Dalton Vanhorn and Joey and Nick White.

Thomas Boles

Thomas Boles is a 13 year old student at Blake Academy. He  was nominated for continued ability to resist peer pressure and to encourage others to avoid wrongful behaviors.  Thomas is president of the National Junior Honor Society, active in the Student Activities Committee and is very involved in the student tutoring program.

 

Dalton Vanhorn

Dalton Vanhorn is a seven year old 1st grade student at Polk City Elementary School. After learning from his parents of the significance of the cards hanging from the “Angel Tree” at a local restaurant, he decided on his own to choose a child’s wish list from the tree. He then purchased gifts with his birthday money so another child could have a nice Christmas.

 

Joey & Nick White

Joey White is a 15 year old 9th grade student at Summerlin Military Institute. His brother Nick White is a 16 year old Junior at George Jenkins High School. After having dinner at a local restaurant with their father, LPD Police Captain Victor White, the three witnessed a mugging in the parking lot. After assisting their father in apprehending the mugger, Joey and Nick aided and comforted the victim until more police units arrived.

To watch the video of the ceremony on line, visit the LGN Video-on-Demand section.


On Saturday, March 12th a one day only Rain Barrel Truckload Sale will be held at the Bay Street Parking Lot, 315 N. Tennessee Ave. (1½ blocks north of the Spring Obsession event being held in Munn Park) from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. The rain barrels will be available for the special price of only $60. The 55 gallon rain barrels are made with maximum recycled content; include insect resistant stainless steel filter, resilient faucet/spigot and an overflow spout.  Rain barrels help conserve water, reduce water cost, reduce stormwater runoff, and protect the environment.

The event is made possible by The City of Lakeland Lakes & Stormwater division, along with Lakeland Water Utilities, Southwest Florida Water Management District, Polk County Natural Resources, Florida Yards and Neighborhoods, and Lakes Education/Action Drive.


In a prepared statement Governor Rick Scott rejects federal funding for high speed rail.  His announcement is below.

I am committed to making good on those promises. Recently, I sent a budget proposal to the legislature that reduces the size and scope of government; reduces the costs of that government and passes those cost savings on to taxpayers so that we can create new jobs and turn Florida's economy around.

I believe when you reduce government's reach and hold that government accountable; you create an environment where the economy can flourish. When you reduce taxes and put that money back in the hands of hardworking Floridians and Florida businesses, that money will be spent on creating private sector jobs

As you know, my background is in business, not politics. But you don't have to be an economics expert to understand that if you spend more money than you take in, your business will fail. Unfortunately, politicians haven't always seemed to grasp that same principle.

In fact, the Obama administration just announced a $3.73 trillion budget that includes the largest budget deficit in our nation's history ($1.65 trillion). The president's budget includes $1.6 trillion in higher taxes.

Those higher taxes will impact Floridians and our competitiveness worldwide. We cannot expect individuals to build businesses in America if our taxes are higher than other countries. Higher taxes and more government spending is a recipe for disaster. Government has become addicted to spending beyond its means and we cannot continue this flawed policy.

Let us never forget, whether it is Washington or Tallahassee, government has no resources of its own. Government can only give to us what it has previously taken from us. That is why today I am announcing my decision to reject the Obama administration's plan to partially-fund the costly Tampa to Orlando high-speed rail project.

Moments ago I spoke with US transportation Secretary Ray LaHood to inform him of my decision. I appreciate the secretary's efforts to work with us and I look forward to working with him in the future.
My decision to reject the project comes down to three main economic realities:

First – capital cost overruns from the project could put Florida taxpayers on the hook for an additional $3 billion.

Second – ridership and revenue projections are historically overly optimistic and would likely result in ongoing subsidies that state taxpayers would have to incur. (from $300 million - $575 million over 10 years)

Note: The state subsidizes Tri-Rail $34.6 million a year while passenger revenues covers only $10.4 million of the $64 million annual operating budget.

Finally – if the project becomes too costly for taxpayers and is shut down, the state would have to return the $2.4 billion in federal funds to D.C.

The truth is that this project would be far too costly to taxpayers and I believe the risk far outweighs the benefits. Historical data shows capital cost overruns are pervasive in 9 out of 10 high speed rail projects and that 2/3 of those projects inflated ridership projections by an average of 65 percent of actual patronage.

It is projected that 3.07 million people will use the train annually. Keep in mind that Amtrak's Acela train in Washington, D.C., Boston, Philadelphia, New York and Baltimore only had 3.2 million riders in 2010. And that market's population is 8 times the size of the Tampa/Orlando market.

President Obama's high-speed rail program is not the answer to Florida's economic recovery. We must make investments in areas where we will get a return for the shareholders – Florida's taxpayers.

Rather than investing in a high-risk rail project, we should be focusing on improving our ports, rail and highway infrastructure to be in a position to attract the increased shipping that will result when the panama canal is expanded when the free trade agreements with Colombia and panama are ratified and with the expansion of the economies of central and south America.

By capturing a larger share of containerized imports entering our seaports, expanding export markets for Florida businesses and emerging as a global hub for trade and investment we can create up to an additional 143,000 jobs according to a recent chamber of commerce study.

It is absolutely critical that we make smart investments with taxpayer dollars, whether state or federal, and I believe our state will be better served by spending these funds on projects that will benefit Florida and not turn into a spending boondoggle. The answer is to reduce government spending, cut government's leash on our state's job creators and then hold that government accountable for the investments it makes.

That is what I was elected to do and that is how I plan to govern. Let's get to work!