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Lakeland Fire Department News


Keeping you informed of what's new with the LFD.

Fire Safety Warning for Hover Boards
Citing media coverage of several recent fire incidents, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) issued a series of safety tips urging hover board owners to read product guidelines and be aware of potential fire hazards when using these trendy devices.
“It seems hover boards are the hottest holiday gifts on the planet this year. But a number of media outlets reported fire incidents are cause for caution to avoid Christmas wishes going up in smoke,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. Part toy, part transportation, the self-balancing scooters based on an idea first seen in the movie Back to the Future, can pose a fire risk. 

“These are fairly new to the mass market and there isn’t a lot we know about them. The best advice we can offer is to read all manufacturers’ guidelines - particularly those that apply to charging hover boards – and to follow some additional fire safety guidelines.”

The Lakeland Fire Department offers the following tips to keep the holidays fire-safe. 

If you purchase a hover board:

· Choose a device with the seal of an independent testing laboratory.
· Read and follow all manufacturer directions.  If you do not understand the directions, ask for help.
· An adult should be responsible for charging the hover board.
· Do not leave a charging hover board unattended.  
· Never leave the hover board plugged in overnight.
· Only use the charging cord that came with the hover board.
· Stop using your hover board if it overheats. 
· Extreme hot or cold temperature can hurt the battery.  
· Be on the lookout for product updates from manufacturers and safety groups.  
· Many airlines have banned hover boards. If you plan to fly with a hover board, be sure to check with your air carrier.
· When riding in a car, keep the hover board where you can see it in case it shows signs of a problem.

Signs of a Problem:

Some hover board fires have involved the Lithium-Ion battery or charger. Signs you may have a problem:

· Leaking fluids
· Excessive heat
· Odor
· Sparking
· Smoke

If you notice any of these signs, stop using the device right away. Call 9-1-1.  If safe to do so, move the hover board outside away from anything that can burn.

If you have had a fire or injury event involving a hover board, contact the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.
As a safety precaution never store the board or charge them indoors. Keep then in a detached garage or storage area if possible. 


Download the Hover Board Safety Tip Sheet here

Lakeland, FL. June 30, 2015 – Shooting-off fireworks on Independence Day is becoming more hazardous, according to a U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) study. The best available data from the CPSC study shows that in 2013, there were eight deaths and an estimated 11,400 consumers who sustained injuries related to fireworks. This represents an increase from 8,700 injuries in 2012. Sixty-five percent, or 7,400, of the injuries in 2013 occurred in the 30 days surrounding July 4.

Fireworks malfunctions and improper use are associated with the most injuries, according to the study. Injuries frequently resulted from users playing with lit fireworks or igniting fireworks while holding the device. Last year, children under age 5 experienced a higher estimated per capita injury rate than any other age group, according to the study. Past reports indicate that consumers sometimes feel comfortable handing off fireworks to children that are perceived to be less powerful, such as sparklers. Sparklers account for more than 40 percent of all estimated injuries.

The department would like to encourage everyone to leave the fireworks to professionals for a safe Independence Day celebration. However, consumers who decide to purchase legal fireworks (Florida law prohibits any fireworks that fly through the air or explode) are strongly encouraged to follow these safety recommendations:

Never allow young children to play with or ignite fireworks, including sparklers. Sparklers burn at temperatures of about 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit -- hot enough to melt some metals;
Always have an adult close by to supervise fireworks activities;
Never place any part of your body directly over a fireworks device when lighting the fuse. Back up to a safe distance immediately after lighting fireworks;
Keep a bucket of water or a garden hose handy in case of fire or other mishap;
Never try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks. Soak them with water and discard;
Never point or throw fireworks at another person;
Never carry fireworks in a pocket or shoot them off in metal or glass containers;
After fireworks complete their burning, douse the spent device with plenty of water from a bucket or hose before discarding the device to prevent a trash fire.

For more fire safety information from the department on fireworks and other important safety topics visit  . Have a SAFE 4thof July. In the event of an emergency 
dial 9-1-1. 

This 4th of July, the Lakeland Fire Department encourages you to stay safe. Each July Fourth, thousands of people, most often children and teens, are injured while using consumer fireworks. Despite the dangers of fireworks, few people understand the associated risks - devastating burns, other injuries, fires, and even death.


NFPA's Dan Doofus urges people not to use consumer fireworks because they are too dangerous. Fireworks are responsible for thousands of fires and injuries each year.
Fireworks by the numbers
  • In 2011, fireworks caused an estimated 17,800 reported fires, including 1,200 total structure fires, 400 vehicle fires, and 16,300 outside and other fires. These fires resulted in an estimated eight reported civilian deaths, 40 civilian injuries and $32 million in direct property damage.
  • In 2012, U.S. hospital emergency rooms treated an estimated 8,700 people for fireworks related injuries; 55% of 2012 emergency room fireworks-related injuries were to the extremities and 31% were to the head.
  • The risk of fireworks injury was highest for young people ages 15-24, followed by children under 10.
  • On Independence Day in a typical year, far more U.S. fires are reported than on any other day, and fireworks account for two out of five of those fires, more than any other cause of fires.

Source: NFPA’s Fireworks report, by John R. Hall, Jr., June 2013
Source: NFPA’s Fireworks Fact Sheet, Fire Analysis and Research Division, June 2014

The LFD’s 7th Annual Open House event that took place Saturday, October 12 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM was a huge success. Approximately 3,000 people showed up making it the largest event put on by the department yet!

Citizen’s came out to learn more about fire safety, to better understand the many different services the department offers the community, and to see the equipment used to keep the citizens of Lakeland safe up close.

Demonstrations we offered every half hour, kitchen fire safety tips were provided, and guests were invited to tour the station and enjoy free goodies and refreshments.

The event is growing every year and plans are already under way to make next year’s event even bigger and better. Mark your calendars because everyone is encouraged to come out and join the department again for its 8th annual Open House event, planned for October 11, 2014.

Check out more information about the event and photos here.